Image1: 11 male and female students standing in front of the US Capitol on the lawn; Image2: woman looking into a drawer of a storage unit with many drawers at indiegenous artifacts with a tapestry with beige, black, grey and feather pattern in the background

AT&T Center for Indigenous Politics & Policy

 Buff decorative line

 

Buff decorative line

 

About the AT&T Center for Indigenous Politics and Policy

The AT&T Center for Indigenous Politics and Policy (AT&T CIPP) is a University-based center whose purpose is to research issues, assist and provide support to tribal leaders, and promote public awareness on issues of national political significance to Indigenous communities, including public health, adequate housing, economic security and education. 
 

More Info About the Center

Buff decorative line

 

NAPLP students in front of the U.S. Capitol Building

Native American Political Leadership Program (NAPLP)

The NAPLP Program provides full academic scholarships for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian undergraduate and graduate students to experience a semester at GW learning about the public policy decision-making process, governmental functions and politics in a democratic society. 

A group shot of 10 high school students partcipating in the Inspire Program posed in the US Senate building in front of wood paneled background

INSPIRE Pre-College Program

The INSPIRE Pre-College Program is a full scholarship program open to Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian rising junior and senior high school students, who want to spend 3-weeks at GW learning about intergovernmental relations between tribal governments and the federal government.

Buff decorative line

News

2 tall red and yellow wooden Totem poles with a horizontal connector laid across them in Congressional Cemetery

CPS Developed App Guides D.C. Visitors to Local Indigenous Landmarks

Dr. Elizabeth Rule, assistant director of the AT&T Center for Indigenous Politics and Policy at the GW College of Professional Studies, designed and developed an app to highlight the contributions of indegenous peoples to the city with a walking tour map and guide available for free download for iOS devices.
A young man, left, stands next to a young woman, right, in the center of a park.

Native American Students Intern on Capitol Hill

Nolan Arkansas and Jordan Oglesby participated in GW's Native American Political Leadership Program and interned with the first Native American women elected to Congress.
2 tall red and yellow wooden Totem poles with a horizontal connector laid across them in Congressional Cemetery

GW Develops a ‘Guide to Indigenous D.C.’

A new tool will help visitors to Washington, D.C., discover the historic and contemporary landmarks of those who inhabited the city’s land before its development as the nation’s capital. “Guide to Indigenous D.C.” is a free mobile app developed by AT&T CIPP in collaboration with the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association.